Value of Technology

Cam Rollins | May 25, 2011

It’s been a busy couple of weeks. I have always had the job of updating the Work Wild website, but recently I’ve also been working on the AFPA site as well. It’s a pretty site, full of bright colours that change with the seasons. I’ve got to write some stuff and add pictures to it as I see fit. One of my favorite classes in high school was computer class. Back when I went to school (4 years ago) we walked uphill both ways in 17 feet of snow. We used to get beat by our teachers with rulers and they made us kneel on frozen peas when we were bad. Yep, those were the good ol’ days. You learned what it was like to really work to achieve something (none of this is true). Computer class was cool back in those days.

Anyways, I found my grade 9 report card the other day. I had a ridiculous blistering good mark of 99% in computer literacy. Ya that’s right, computers and I communicate well 99% of the time. I was shocked to find that a lot of high schoolers hate computer class. It’s not a novelty to be able to use a computer like it used to be and learning how to type, use Microsoft Office, or build a website isn’t fun anymore. Way less fun than playing games. A lot of young people get into computer programming because they want to design games, and programs that everyone uses every day. Did you know the majority of computer programming gigs in BC are designing computer systems for forest products companies? Crazy hey? There’s more lazer beams and computers in a lumber mill than you could even comprehend before setting foot in one.

Even the technology in my job as a forester is intense. I need to understand GIS and mapping, data collection , stats software and modelling programs that solve problems that would be basically impossible with pen and paper. I also apparently need to understand website design. Every career in the forest industry uses crazay amounts of technology. Operating harvesting machines has basically become a giant video game. Even our trucks have blue tooth connectivity and sync with phones and computers.

Basically what I’m saying is the forest industry is one of the most hi-tech in the world and is becoming even moreso as we dive into things like using cellulose fibers to make plastics, food additives, medicine, bio-energy and textiles. Understanding the basics of computers is important and as much as it sucks to learn things like proper typing technique, it makes you blazingly efficient in whatever you’re doing for a career. So don’t give up on computers, you will actually use them in your real life job one day. Unlike chemistry. Who likes that class anyways? The labs burnt through my clothes and nothing ever exploded.

PS – When it comes to computers, although I don’t have professional training, I will pwn all you n00bs. I have skills you don’t even understand. Pure pwnage.

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Work Wild is a campaign that reaches out to youth who are about to make one of the most important choices in their lives — their career. We’re here to educate you on the diversity of employment choices in forestry and open some eyes to the amazing benefits of working in this sustainable industry.

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